How often have you asked yourself questions like these:

  • What are the most common devices on which customers are using our app?
  • What is the most common path users take to get to this feature?
  • How can I better tailor my testing to real customer use cases?
  • How can we make using our app a better experience for our clients?

At WillowTree, many of our customers have chosen to incorporate Google Analytics tracking into the websites and apps that we build for them. Often, developers implement these tags without fully realizing the awesome potential these little snippets of code can offer.

For a QA Engineer like myself, the sorts of insights that an analytics tool can provide are invaluable – how users move through applications, what features they interact with most, and where they abandon workflows. You can use this data to become a better, more informed tester and facilitate conversations amongst your team about user behavior that will help all of you to build a higher-quality, more useful (and more used!) app or website.

You may be thinking “But I have no experience with analytics tools!” You’re in luck! There are many resources available to help you learn to master the powerful tool that is Google Analytics.

The best option is free training from Google’s own Analytics Academy. Here you can find video tutorials, including “Google Analytics for Beginners” (which covers the basic ABCs of Google Analytics) and “Advanced Google Analytics” (which reviews more in-depth topics like how to filter reports, set up segments, event tracking, and other ways to slice and dice your data).

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Once you’ve completed the training courses, you can then get Google Analytics qualified by taking the Google Analytics Individual Qualification, an online skills assessment that covers data analytics best practices and usage of Google Analytics. There are lots of resources out there to help you study for and pass the exam. Here are just a few:

By becoming a certified user of Google Analytics, you can learn how to find valuable pieces of information about your customers and how they are using your apps and sites. You can use this knowledge to write better test cases, create customer personas, and be able to better converse with your analytics or insights team about how users are interacting with your app.