The Essential Guide to Career Fair Success

No matter what year you are, going to a career fair is both an exciting and daunting task. You’ll see representatives from really cool companies, along with organizations you’ve never heard of. And all of them will be talking to you about their company culture, available positions, and much more. How do you prepare?

Research the companies at the fair. Much of the time, recruiters at these career fairs hear, “So, what does your company do?” It is much more impressive for them to meet a recruit who says they have done research and can say that they’re interested in the company. Not only will this make you look good to companies, but it will also help you narrow down the booths you want to go to, making your career fair experience far more efficient. The research you do does not have to be extremely time-consuming – a quick look on their website to find out exactly what the company does is really the maximum of what you need to do. You can also prepare your elevator pitch and have it ready for the companies you want to work for. This leaves room for more interesting questions.

Speaking of questions, ask them. Some sample questions that you could ask are below, and this list is just a beginning:

  • What is the company culture like?
  • Tell me about the most meaningful project you (or your team) have worked on.
  • What are some projects I could work on?>
  • Tell me about some opportunities interns have gotten after their internships.
  • What is your interview process like?
  • Is there something missing from my resume that would make me a good fit for your company?
  • What can I do to improve my skills before we speak next?
  • How do I apply for this position?

Be respectful of the recruiter’s time. If you are in a super long line, make sure you’re not trying to talk to the recruiter for 20 minutes.…

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With Black Friday and Cyber Monday past and the holiday season upon us, there are soon to be thousands more proud owners of Google Home, Google’s recent foray into the realm of the “smart” or “connected” home (as well as its answer to Amazon’s Echo). Home gives users all the search capabilities and assorted superpowers of Google Assistant, but with always-on voice-operated availability. Normally, to use Google Assistant you would either need a Pixel phone or you would need to download the Allo messaging app to your iOS or Android smartphone. Home conveniently turns Assistant into a virtual housemate ready to act on your every request.

Imagine the possibilities. Happily, Google already has!

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In a world where phones are still sold with only 16GB (much less the odd 8GB devices) of storage space, managing free space can be a challenge. As a developer, this can cause issues when trying to store larger files on a user’s device that are crucial to the experience of using your apps. Luckily Android 7.1 adds a new feature to make everyone’s life a little easier: storage manager intents!

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To many observers, 2016 was at best a lackluster year for mobile innovation, save the Pokemon Go craze (which ended up not unleashing an AR revolution) and the new Google Pixel phone. Some have argued innovation in mobile has run its course and we are destined for performance-only improvements for the foreseeable future, like we’ve been seeing in the desktop market for a decade.

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I was recently invited to talk to a group of students in a Masters Data Science program at a nearby university. Long story short, my mandate was to help prepare them to find jobs after graduation. There are worse positions to be in these days than having a Data Science degree, but many of these students have never interviewed for anything more than an internship so I covered everything from resumes through offer letters.

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What is a Markov Chain? How are they used in language auto completion, video game AI, or other predictive applications? How can we make a bunch of sentences to laugh at for hours? Let’s find out in this episode of WillowTalk!

 

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In the mobile development world, regardless of the platform, lists that display data to the user are commonly used in many projects. The Android platform gives us two different types of views that can be leveraged to display lists of data—the  ListView and the RecyclerView.

My friend and team member, Brandon Carter, wrote a post about creating performant ListViews, which I highly recommend reading if you need to use a ListView in your project. Today, however, we are going to focus on the more advanced Android view-type to present lists—the RecyclerView.

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Smartphones are crucial to modern life. They are our communications platform, our entertainment hub, and our most-used utility. They are our constant companions. Until recently, smartphones have missed out on deep integration into what is usually our second biggest investment: Cars. The big trend in automotive tech lately has been integrating them seamlessly with the car’s head unit either via Apple’s CarPlay or Google’s Android Auto. The only problem? You had to buy a new car or a rather expensive (and at times complicated to install) head unit to use these new features!

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While I was exploring my new Pixel XL, one of the things I noticed while setting up the perfect home screen was a pop-up menu when long pressing on certain apps. This immediately piqued my curiosity so I went looking to see what this mystery menu was; and then I discovered app shortcuts. App shortcuts are new in Android 7.1 and can be seen on Nexus and Pixel devices. You can have up to five shortcuts for your app at one time (although Google recommends four) and users of your shortcuts can also pin them to the launcher.

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Every day people ask me questions like, “Where is mobile going?” “Aren’t apps a fad?” “Will everything go to the browser?” “Aren’t chatbots the future?”

Humans interact with technology to do something better or faster. It’s that simple. The big breakthroughs of the past two centuries (telephones, cars, airplanes, radios, TVs, computers, the internet, mobile devices, etc.) show this to be true.

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